Final Farewell

Today, is a sad day, it’s our last day all together and even though many of us are traveling after it will be very different. As A.A. Milne wrote “How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.” We have all been very blessed to have been given this opportunity and I am so happy to have met everyone that has been here and have learned so much from all of them and Darcy and Howard as well as their spouses. Safe travels to everyone tomorrow and see you back at school.

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Grace

Today, we had a speaker by the name of Grace Robinson. She was an incredibly sweet woman at the ripe age of 83 and still full of wit. Her photography was incredible and very old. It’s crazy to see photos from such a different time and to hear the person who took them speak about them. I sat before her imagining her actually being in these places and time periods that to me seem almost other worldly, its mind blowing how much she has seen the world change in her lifetime. This is one of the photos she showed us that she took in 1954,Image

As Grace said “You’re only in this life once… enjoy it.”

Field Trip Day

Today, we went on the ultimate field trip! Starting bright and early being out of the door by 4 o’clock we had a lot of napping time on the bus along with plenty of time for adventure. Starting out with a sunrise at Stonehenge was one of the most amazing ways anyone could kick off a new day.

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Afterward, we saw one of the most beautiful churches I have ever encountered with the most beautiful baptismal font.

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And if those stops weren’t enough we kept going and got to see an Abby and enjoy a wonderful traditional English meal all together. Today was a great day and one of the most accomplished on the trip!

First Day as Londoners

Today, we started out the day with everyone’s very first tube ride! We took the tube to the V&A The National Museum of Art and Design. When we got there we were met by Martin Barnes who has been a curator for the photography at the V&A for 18 years now. The V&A was the first museum to start a photography collection and the first museum to have a photography exhibition. Martin took us through “A History of Photography” which showed us the way photography has progressed. After talking to the group about it a little he split us into three groups, apples, pears and plums and had each group pick one photograph to dissect and tell him out thoughts as well as hearing his. ImageAfterward we broke for lunch and some people stayed and ate at the V&A while others wandered a bit and found other restaurants. We then all met back and went to the Natural History Museum and saw Sebastiao Salgado “Genesis.” Sebastiao’s work was amazing but unfortunately we were not allowed to take pictures. “Genesis” was an extremely moving piece of work that was focused on places in the world that are still natural and help us see the impact we have on what’s around us. The exhibition started with photographs from Antarctica and moved along though many places like Indonesia, Africa, Brazil and many more. The body of work he created could take many people a life time because of how vast and diverse it was but he created this between 2004 and 2012. The exhibition included landscapes, animals and humans yet it all flowed and went together so well, it was truly amazing. It took me a little while to actually realize that the photographs were all black and white because of how much contrast they had and how vivid and captivating they were it wasn’t the thing that stood out to me but rather the content of it.

Tonight, we are going to enjoy our first Friday night in London all together.

Hiroshi Sugimoto ‘Revolution’

Gabrielle Wickens

Hiroshi Sugimoto ‘Revolution’

Hiroshi’s concept was the most unusual one I came across at my time in Arles, his focus was on out of body experiences and his story at the start of the exhibition explained that when he was young he used to have dreams of being outside of his body and watching himself sleep and he hadn’t experience it in a long time until he was getting a shot like the horizon ones in his exhibit. I thought it was a little bit of a crazy idea since I have never had an experience like that but his photos do as good of a job as I could imagine in trying to portray it. The whole exhibition was 10 photos and they were all horizon pictures in black and white with 8 of the turned the vertical way. It was hard for me at first to understand what the photos were but after you realize they are all enchanting in a way and you stand there for a few minutes at each.

This exhibition taught me that sometimes the idea of a body of work could be something much deeper than the obvious answer. These photos would have been interesting on their own but knowing what was going on with the photographer during the making of them changes how the viewer feel about a photo.

The photograph that caught my eye the most at this exhibition was, in my opinion, the most simplistic photograph of the ten. Many of the photos had lights streaking through them but this one was just half black and half dark grey with a moon of the one thirds line. Is was so simple that you had to really look to see the differences in it and see that it wasn’t just black.Image

Guy Bourdin ‘Untouched’

Aside

Gabrielle Wickens

This exhibition was about Guy’s work as a fashion photographer but focused on his black and white work that was not well known during his own time. The exhibition had many parts to it, the first memorable one was “The Polaroid’s of Guy Bourdin” and these photos were not his work they were his personal photos and the feeling  I got while looking at them really made me think about how his life was rather than his job and that was an interesting feeling compared to the rest of his work, they made me put my self into his shoes and realize this was something he really experienced rather than a set up shot and made me imagine myself in his shoes rather than in the shoes of the subject. Another part that caught my interest was a series of photographs that a woman just recently found and printed onto cardboard and she was very surprised by the result of them, they were beautiful black and white shots by Guy that were never developed. My favorite part of his work that was shown would have to have been “A message for you” which was a slide show of  his photographs of one woman that was a series for French Vogue and they were all so intriguing. They photos played around a lot with different things and were clearly a lot of work because in many of them they had photos in the photos and he played around a lot with using shots of just her legs or photos that focused on her legs but they were all incredible.

This exhibition taught me a lot about fashion photography. I loved the angles he used and the lighting and the positions of the models. I’ve looked at magazines before but these photos were much more high end and intriguing and caused me to analyze the photos in a different way and will help me to continue to analyze fashion photography in a new way.

The most memorable photo for me was one that came from “A message for you” and it was the subject, Nicolle Meyer, walked down a sidewalk and only her legs were in the photo but there were two photos of her face looking at each other that were crumpled up and her feet were in between them. This photo caught my eye because I had never seen anything like it and I knew that to think up that shot you had to be very creative.

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Aside

Gabrielle Wickens

Guy Bourdin ‘Untouched’

This exhibition was about Guy’s work as a fashion photographer but focused on his black and white work that was not well known during his own time. The exhibition had many parts to it, the first memorable one was “The Polaroid’s of Guy Bourdin” and these photos were not his work they were his personal photos and the feeling  I got while looking at them really made me think about how his life was rather than his job and that was an interesting feeling compared to the rest of his work, they made me put my self into his shoes and realize this was something he really experienced rather than a set up shot and made me imagine myself in his shoes rather than in the shoes of the subject. Another part that caught my interest was a series of photographs that a woman just recently found and printed onto cardboard and she was very surprised by the result of them, they were beautiful black and white shots by Guy that were never developed. My favorite part of his work that was shown would have to have been “A message for you” which was a slide show of  his photographs of one woman that was a series for French Vogue and they were all so intriguing. They photos played around a lot with different things and were clearly a lot of work because in many of them they had photos in the photos and he played around a lot with using shots of just her legs or photos that focused on her legs but they were all incredible.

This exhibition taught me a lot about fashion photography. I loved the angles he used and the lighting and the positions of the models. I’ve looked at magazines before but these photos were much more high end and intriguing and caused me to analyze the photos in a different way and will help me to continue to analyze fashion photography in a new way.

The most memorable photo for me was one that came from “A message for you” and it was the subject, Nicolle Meyer, walked down a sidewalk and only her legs were in the photo but there were two photos of her face looking at each other that were crumpled up and her feet were in between them. This photo caught my eye because I had never seen anything like it and I knew that to think up that shot you had to be very creative.Image